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Arnica and Bursitis

Arnica and bursitis are not linked in terms of cure all, but studies indicate it canít necessarily hurt to take arnica when experiencing a bout of bursitis.


Bursitis is a condition of an inflamed bursa which is a type of sac or cushion that lies between two moving surfaces. This placement of a bursa reduces friction and allows pain free movement. Inflammation of the bursa results in painful movement and further inflammation of the joint.

Arnica and Bursitis
Arnica and Bursitis

Arnica is a perennial herb that grows commonly in central Europe. The flower of this herb is bright yellow and could be toxic if taken internally. For this reason arnica treatments are usually processed into tinctures, creams, and capsules instead of remaining in its natural form.

Arnica and bursitis were linked when the topical creams were noted to have an analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect on soft tissue injuries such as strains, sprains, arthritis, and gout. These conditions, including bursitis, are sensitive to touch and constant manipulation. So, the application of cream made arnica and bursitis a match. The damaged joint could remain motionless in a comfortable position and the pain relieving cream could be applied. This remedy is usually administered in association with the intake of herbal anti-inflammatory proteolytic enzymes.

The match of arnica and bursitis treatment makes sense due to the way arnica works. Arnica functions to release the trapped fluid from within the muscles and joints. It also reduces fluid retention in bruised tissues. Knowledge of arnica and bursitis signs and symptoms can help speed recovery times.





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